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dc.contributor.authorPiątkowska, Maria
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-01T13:05:37Z
dc.date.available2016-03-01T13:05:37Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn978-83-942923-1-7
dc.identifier.urihttps://depot.ceon.pl/handle/123456789/9064
dc.description.abstractMaria Piątkowska’s chapter Zombie-Nazis in Horrors, or How the Zombie SS Became Part of Popular Culture notes that undead Nazi soldiers appeared in the cinema as early as the 1940s: the black comedy King of the Zombies (1941) directed by Jean Yar-brough was even nominated for an Academy Award for best music. The decades of the 1970s and 1980s abounded in various, often trashy, depictions of zombie-Nazis who aimed to restore the greatness of the Third Reich, e.g. Shock Waves (1977) or Oasis of the Zombies (1981). Contemporary producers and directors have continued using the image of the zombie SS soldier in their cinematic productions. The 21st Cen-tury has witnessed the appearance of such films as: Dead Snow (2009), Horrors at War (2006), and Outpost (2008). Why is this theme constantly used in popular culture? The Third Reich is aptly associated with the idea of pure evil, and the popular culture craves evil. The iconography of the Nazis (e.g., their interest in occultism and refer-ences to German mythology) fits the popular image of evil forces in film and literature. By combining this theme with the cruel zombie, one may obtain an almost immortal villain.en
dc.language.isoplpl_PL
dc.publisherOśrodek Badawczy Facta Fictapl_PL
dc.rightsCreative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/pl/legalcode
dc.subjectvoodooizmpl_PL
dc.subjectproszek zombiepl_PL
dc.subjectbokorpl_PL
dc.subjectHaitipl_PL
dc.subjectvoodoopl_PL
dc.subjectpunkpl_PL
dc.subjectsubwersywnośćpl_PL
dc.subjectsubwersjapl_PL
dc.subjectdystopiepl_PL
dc.subjectdystopiapl_PL
dc.subjectnarracje zombie-centrycznepl_PL
dc.subjectnarracja zombie-centrycznapl_PL
dc.subjectkonsumpcjonizmpl_PL
dc.subjectkrytyka kapitalizmupl_PL
dc.subjectekokrytykapl_PL
dc.subjectkrytyka politycznapl_PL
dc.subjectkrytyka neoliberalizmupl_PL
dc.subjectneoliberalizmpl_PL
dc.subjectkapitalizmpl_PL
dc.subjectnieumarłypl_PL
dc.subjectnarracja postapokaliptycznapl_PL
dc.subjectpostapokalipsapl_PL
dc.subjectpostapopl_PL
dc.subjectżywe trupypl_PL
dc.subjecthistoria zombiepl_PL
dc.subjectfilozofia zombiepl_PL
dc.subjectzombiezmpl_PL
dc.subjectzombifikacjapl_PL
dc.subjectniesamowitepl_PL
dc.subjectgrozapl_PL
dc.subjecthorrorpl_PL
dc.subjectfantastykapl_PL
dc.subjectpopkulturapl_PL
dc.subjectponowoczesnośćpl_PL
dc.subjectzombiepl_PL
dc.subjectOśrodek Badawczy Facta Fictapl_PL
dc.subjectPerspektywy Ponowoczesnościpl_PL
dc.titleZombie-naziści w horrorach, czyli jak Zombie SS stało się elementem popkulturypl_PL
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/bookPartpl_PL
dc.contributor.organizationUniwersytet Warszawskipl_PL
dc.description.epersonOśrodek Badawczy Facta Ficta
dc.rights.DELETETHISFIELDinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess


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Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska